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May 2021

Monday, 24 May 2021 00:00

Treatment for Hammertoe

Hammertoe is a type of foot deformity in which the toes bend upward at the middle joint, giving them a hammer-like appearance. This condition is usually caused by a muscle or tendon imbalance, but can be aggravated by wearing shoes that are too tight or narrow in the front or have excessively high heels. In the initial stages, the hammertoe may still be flexible and the toes can be straightened. In later stages, the toes can become rigid and you will not be able to straighten them. Flexible hammertoe can be treated by wearing shoes that are comfortable and have a wide toe box, wearing orthotic inserts, and stretching and exercising the toes. Rigid hammertoe may require surgery to correct it. If you have hammertoe, please consult with a podiatrist to see which treatment options may be right for you.

Hammertoes can be a painful condition to live with. For more information, contact Dr. Odin De Los Reyes of Connecticut. Our doctor will answer any of your foot- and ankle-related questions.

Hammertoe

Hammertoe is a foot deformity that occurs due to an imbalance in the muscles, tendons, or ligaments that normally hold the toe straight. It can be caused by the type of shoes you wear, your foot structure, trauma, and certain disease processes.

Symptoms

  • Painful and/or difficult toe movement
  • Swelling
  • Joint stiffness
  • Calluses/Corns
  • Physical deformity

Risk Factors

  • Age – The risk of hammertoe increases with age
  • Sex – Women are more likely to have hammertoe compared to men
  • Toe Length – You are more likely to develop hammertoe if your second toe is longer than your big toe
  • Certain Diseases – Arthritis and diabetes may make you more likely to develop hammertoe

Treatment

If you have hammertoe, you should change into a more comfortable shoe that provides enough room for your toes. Exercises such as picking up marbles may strengthen and stretch your toe muscles. Nevertheless, it is important to seek assistance from a podiatrist in order to determine the severity of your hammertoe and see which treatment option will work best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Southbury and Farmington, CT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about What Are Hammertoes?
Thursday, 20 May 2021 00:00

It's Time for Beautiful Feet

You don't need an excuse to have beautiful nails. Step outside without worrying about the appearance of your feet.

Monday, 17 May 2021 00:00

What Causes Sever's Disease?

Sever’s disease is a common heel injury among children caused by swelling in the growth plate of the heel bone. During early adolescence, bones often grow faster than muscles or tendons. While the heel bone grows slowly, the muscles and tendons attached to it can become tight and make the heel area less flexible. These tight heel tendons can put too much pressure on the back of the heel during weight-bearing exercises like running or jumping, thus injuring the heel and causing Sever’s disease. Symptoms of this condition include heel pain that may increase with physical activity, redness and swelling in the heel area, and difficulty walking or putting weight on the heels. If your child complains of foot or heel pain it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist right away, and this will help to prevent any further complications. 

Sever's disease often occurs in children and teens. If your child is experiencing foot or ankle pain, see Dr. Odin De Los Reyes from Connecticut. Our doctor can treat your child’s foot and ankle needs.

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s disease is also known as calcaneal apophysitis, which is a medical condition that causes heel pain I none or both feet. The disease is known to affect children between the ages of 8 and 14.

Sever’s disease occurs when part of the child’s heel known as the growth plate (calcaneal epiphysis) is attached to the Achilles tendon. This area can suffer injury when the muscles and tendons of the growing foot do not keep pace with bone growth. Therefore, the constant pain which one experiences at the back of the heel will make the child unable to put any weight on the heel. The child is then forced to walk on their toes.

Symptoms

Acute pain – Pain associated with Sever’s disease is usually felt in the heel when the child engages in physical activity such as walking, jumping and or running.

Highly active – Children who are very active are among the most susceptible in experiencing Sever’s disease, because of the stress and tension placed on their feet.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Southbury and Farmington, CT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle injuries.

Read more about Sever's Disease
Monday, 03 May 2021 00:00

What Does Cuboid Syndrome Feel Like?

Cuboid syndrome is a condition in which the cuboid bone, located in the middle of the foot, becomes misaligned due to injury. This can cause sharp pain on the outer side of the foot, as well as underneath the foot. The pain can come on suddenly and gradually worsen while you walk or stand, but can be relieved by taking weight off of the affected foot. You may also notice mild swelling along the outside of the foot. The symptoms of cuboid syndrome can make it difficult or impossible to walk, and pain can persist for days or even weeks. If you are experiencing foot pain, it is strongly suggested that you seek the care of a podiatrist, who can diagnose and treat your condition. 

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Dr. Odin De Los Reyes from Connecticut. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Southbury and Farmington, CT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about All About Cuboid Syndrome
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